A message to my children

Yes, I’m growing older.  One day I’ll be really old, and then you will have to make up your minds what you do with me.  I ask one thing.  Please don’t send me anywhere where I am obliged to play Bingo……………………………………….

Today I was shopping at the supermarket.  There was a collection point for items to be put into parcels as gifts for the elderly.  I glanced into the box as we went in – it was full of the cheapest possible tins of baked beans and peas.  The whole thing seemed a pointless exercise.  The recipients probably spend their lives eating the cheapest beans or peas, why would they want the same as a gift?  I remember my mother being on the receiving end of one of these packages a while ago.  Cheap tea bags, cheap beans, cheap peas and cheap tissues.  I had contributed a whole box (48) of chocolate to the same charity, none of her friends received any either, all their packages contained the same as hers.  The parcels were presented at a Christmas party for the elderly, it was the only one she ever attended.

If you are adding anything to such a collection this year I just ask that you think twice before throwing ‘just anything’ in.  I don’t contribute any more.  I put together a package and leave it for an elderly neighbour.

12 thoughts on “A message to my children

  1. I get disgusted by the way older people are treated, especially in hospital. I helped an elderly lady who was covered in bruises last time I was in hospital, she was confused and was treated as if she was just a nuisance by nurses. They didn’t even try to talk to her properly. I keep my mind active and hopefully I will remain in control but it is hard when you are very sick; people do take advantage.

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    1. Our neighbour has just called in. Her mother, 96, had a fall and is in hospital. She lives 250 miles away and has been really poorly. She is confused and too exhausted even to wash herself. The hospital have just phoned to say that they are discharging her – to a house with no other occupant and rooms on 3 floors……. Needless to say our neighbour is off to make sure this doesn’t happen, but how can this be proposed by a ‘caring’ profession?

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  2. That is a great idea. But there are lots of other needy people who would benefit from a contribution to a reputable Charity–like the Salvation Army too.

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    1. Indeed, Noel, they are the one charity that I do support at Christmas and at other times too as their work is really charitable. The group I referred to is a local ‘business’ charity.

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  3. A thoughtful post and so true. I try to give to my neighbors, both young and old, at least two to three Saturdays a month by providing early breakfast, i.e. hot biscuits or Krispy Kreme donuts. Perhaps this is not the same as giving a gift basket at Christmas; my neighbors are not needy but at least three of the recipients are in their 80s and have had health problems; the young ones have been so kind to the older ones so I include them. Hopefully, since my two children live so far away, these same neighbors will make sure I’m not thrown away when my time comes!

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  4. Sad really… We often say that it’s the thought that counts… but the thought must be done with compassion and care… If people stopped to think about what they were tossing in the basket and imagined themselves as the recipients of such holiday gifts, I hope they’d reconsider. I find that the ones that work successfully are were the request comes with specific instructions; it’s the holidays, think of gifting, be generous, tomorrow it could be you. Thank you for shedding light on this practice.

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  5. Great post and one that I follow as well. I try to throw in something something I would like to eat – something sweet and something salty. I appreciate this post and hope the spark continues for all the ‘givers’ of the world!

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